How to Write the Brown University and PLME Essays 2021-2022

 

Brown University has four supplemental essay prompts, including one optional response. There are also additional prompts you must answer if you are interested in the Program in Liberal Medical Education (PLME) and/or the Brown|Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) A.B./B.F.A. Dual Degree Program (BRDD).

 

Since Brown receives thousands of applications from academically-strong students, your essays are your chance to stand out. In this post, we’ll discuss how to craft an engaging response to each of these prompts that will catch the attention of the Brown admissions officers.

 

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The Brown University Supplemental Essay Prompts

 

All Applicants

 

Prompt 1 (optional): Some schools offer students the opportunity to take national exams in areas such as math and language. These exams include, but are not limited to, AIME, AMC 10, Le Grand Concours, National Spanish Exam, National Latin Exams. If you have taken any of these exams (or any other subject-based national or international examinations), please inform us of the exams and scores you find most meaningful. (250 words)

 

Prompt 2: Brown’s Open Curriculum allows students to explore broadly while also diving deeply into their academic pursuits. Tell us about any academic interests that excite you, and how you might use the Open Curriculum to pursue them while also embracing topics with which you are unfamiliar. (200-250 words)

 

Prompt 3: Brown’s culture fosters a community in which students challenge the ideas of others and have their ideas challenged in return, promoting a deeper and clearer understanding of the complex issues confronting society. This active engagement in dialogue is as present outside the classroom as it is in academic spaces. Tell us about a time you were challenged by a perspective that differed from your own. How did you respond? (200-250 words) 

 

Prompt 4: Brown students care deeply about their work and the world around them. Students find contentment, satisfaction, and meaning in daily interactions and major discoveries. Whether big or small, mundane or spectacular, tell us about something that brings you joy. (200-250 words) 

 

RISD Dual Degree Applicants

 

Prompt 1: The Brown|RISD Dual Degree Program draws on the complementary strengths of Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) to provide students with the opportunity to explore diverse spheres of academic and creative inquiry, culminating in a capstone project that interrelates the content, approaches, and methods from two distinct learning experiences.

 

Based on your understanding of the academic programs at Brown and RISD and the possibilities created by the BRDD program’s broadened learning community, specifically describe how and why the BRDD program would constitute an optimal undergraduate education for you. As part of your answer, be sure to articulate how you might contribute to the Dual Degree community and its commitment to interdisciplinary work. (100-650 words)

 

PLME Applicants

 

Prompt 1: Committing to a future career as a physician while in high school requires careful consideration and self-reflection. What values and experiences have led you to believe that becoming a doctor in medicine is the right fit for you? (250 words) 

 

Prompt 2: Select one of the following to answer for the second essay: (250 words) 

 

  1. Health care is constantly changing, as it is affected by racial and social disparities, economics, politics, and technology, among other factors. How will you, as a future physician, make a positive impact?
  2. How do you feel your personal background provides you with a unique perspective of medicine?

 

Prompt 3: How do you envision the Program in Liberal Medical Education (PLME) helping you to meet your academic personal and professional goals as a person and as a physician of the future? (500 words) 

 

All Applicants, Prompt 1 (optional)

Some schools offer students the opportunity to take national exams in areas such as math and language. These exams include, but are not limited to, AIME, AMC 10, Le Grand Concours, National Spanish Exam, National Latin Exams. If you have taken any of these exams (or any other subject-based national or international examinations), please inform us of the exams and scores you find most meaningful. (250 words)

 

This prompt allows you to share the results of language exams that aren’t traditionally reported on the Common App. You should include exams in which you performed well, especially if they’re related to your academic or career goals. 

 

While this is a generous word count for a simple question, your response doesn’t have to be fancy. We would recommend listing the tests in order of importance to you, with your scores and the percentile (or some other context of how you performed). The exams and scores you list should only be from 9th grade onwards, unless you have a super impressive score from a bit earlier on. 

 

Example format:

 

Test de connaissance du français (TCF) – C2 (highest level of fluency in French). Taken October 2020. 

 

If it isn’t already addressed in other parts of your application, you can also explain why this particular test or language is important to you. Your scores may be meaningful because of the journey to reach this level of fluency, you want to continue studying this topic in college, or you can demonstrate your growth in a subject over multiple tests.

 

If we were to continue the example above, the student might write this after they list their test:

 

After attending weekly French-English language sessions with an exchange student from Paris my sophomore year, I was able to improve my French speaking skills from B1 at the beginning of sophomore year to C2 at the beginning of my junior year. Being fluent in French will bring me one step closer to achieving my goal of working in international business and conversing with a global network of clients.

 

All Applicants, Prompt 2

Brown’s Open Curriculum allows students to explore broadly while also diving deeply into their academic pursuits. Tell us about any academic interests that excite you, and how you might use the Open Curriculum to pursue them while also embracing topics with which you are unfamiliar. (200-250 words)

 

This prompt provides an opportunity to illustrate one of your unique characteristics and how it has driven you to pursue a particularly impactful extracurricular activity, volunteer or work experience. While many essays aim to illustrate personal growth, this prompt aims to unpack the impact of your actions on others; this can be as simple as altering someone’s perception by presenting a different point of view, derived from your unique background. 

 

One way to start the essay is by focusing on one particular experience, beginning with your unique characteristic that led to your involvement, and following the impact your actions/choices/activity had on those around you. You can then emphasize how you will bring these traits to Brown, and contribute to the community through similar opportunities available on campus (cite them if they currently exist, otherwise suggest expanding these opportunities once you reach campus).

You have the opportunity to delve deeply into one particular experience of activity, although your essay still needs to remain focused given the 250 word limit. However, the activity and impact do not necessarily have to be large-scale. You could, for example, emphasize a specific moment that led to a particularly impactful interaction, rather than focusing on a general activity or extracurricular. Focusing on a meaningful impact, rather than a wide-reaching one, may better illustrate the traits that you would bring with you to Brown to enrich the university community. 

 

Example 1: Let’s imagine you are interested in politics and you are a first generation immigrant to the US from Denmark. You could discuss how your participation in your debate club or model UN – or you could share a discussion that you had with the model UN planning committee during lunch, and the consequences of sharing your perspective on a particular topic (e.g. if you were Danish, perhaps the notion of being paid to study at University by the government rather than needing to incur huge student loans in the US). Focus on presenting concrete consequences of your actions, and you could finish your essay by explaining how you will contribute to the intellectual diversity at Brown through your unique perspective. 

 

Alternatively, you could approach this essay by focusing on skills you have cultivated, rather than personality traits, which enable you to contribute to the Brown University community by applying them on campus. 

 

Example 2: Maybe you’re a nationally ranked theremin player (an unusual electromagnetic instrument). You could discuss your struggles and triumphs in learning the instrument, and dive into the experience of playing at a concert, or your drive behind pursuing the painstaking practice for years on end to hone your skills (emphasizing your admirable work ethic). You could then emphasize your desire to join the Brown University Orchestra, and the benefit your instrument would bring by expanding the potential musical repertoire, thereby enriching Brown’s community. 

 

 

All Applicants, Prompt 3

Brown’s culture fosters a community in which students challenge the ideas of others and have their ideas challenged in return, promoting a deeper and clearer understanding of the complex issues confronting society. This active engagement in dialogue is as present outside the classroom as it is in academic spaces. Tell us about a time you were challenged by a perspective that differed from your own. How did you respond? (200-250 words) 

 

Brown is interested in putting together a diverse class of thinkers who have been challenged by differing perspectives and are willing to learn from them. This prompt wants you to focus on an event in your life that challenged your way of thinking, and how you responded and learned from this experience. This event could occur within the classroom, like reading a thought-provoking novel in English class, or outside the classroom, like learning about a different way to cook your favorite dish. 

 

To write this essay effectively, you should choose an experience that had a deep emotional impact on you. Since your essays are a chance to “win over” admissions officers, the best way to do that is get them to empathize with you and feel like they understand your personality and thought process. A successful essay will answer these three questions as it tells the story of what occurred: What was your perspective (and mindset) before you were challenged? Who or what challenged your thinking and how did it feel to be challenged? Have you adapted your actions, perspectives, or way of thinking based on this experience? However, avoid only including narrative in your essay and not including your thoughts. The reader wants to know you and not just the story that led to your introspective metamorphosis. 

 

One topic we recommend staying away from is sharing how you used to be closed-minded about certain groups of people (like certain cultures or sexualities), but now are open-minded. While you may be more open-minded now, this sort of situation doesn’t present yourself in the best light. Instead, think about situations that are more nuanced and allow you to share more of your personality.

 

Here’s an example of strong response:

 

“‘A dress code?!’ Every head snapped to the back of the room, watching a dumbfounded expression creep across my face after hearing the words of my teacher. Starting Monday, every student would be required to wear clean-cut khakis and blue or white polo shirts. No more graphic tees, matching sets, leggings, or jean jackets. I was the girl who knew everything about fashion—people asked where I bought my clothes from and my friends always asked my opinion before getting dressed for an event—but if I can’t show my sense of style, who will I be? Wandering the halls the rest of the day, I was lost and dejected.

 

But I wouldn’t stay that way. All weekend, I rummaged through the dark depths of my closet looking for belts, scarves, shoes, and jewelry. Running through hours of YouTube videos, I attempted to perfect dutch braids, heatless curls, and fancy updos. On Monday morning I had necklaces layered over the collar of my polo shirt, a studded belt looped through my khakis, white leather booties, and a blue clip, to match my shirt, holding my hair style up. I finished the look with some winged eyeliner and lip gloss. As I walked into school, I felt I was betraying my lonely clothes hanging in my closet, but to my surprise, my confidence was stronger than ever. People still asked where my shoes and jewelry were from, and my friends forced me to braid their hair during our free period. It didn’t matter what I wore, people trusted my fashion advice because of what I knew. Without those boring khakis and polos, I might have never figured out what people valued in me.”

 

This essay accomplishes the three goals for this prompt: 1) Share your perspective before you were challenged, 2) explain what you thought and felt when you were challenged, 3) show what you’ve learned or how you’ve grown from this experience. If you can include these three things in your response, and include a deep emotional connection, you should be good to go! 

  

All Applicants, Prompt 4

Brown students care deeply about their work and the world around them. Students find contentment, satisfaction, and meaning in daily interactions and major discoveries. Whether big or small, mundane or spectacular, tell us about something that brings you joy. (200-250 words) 

 

This essay prompt is very similar to the extracurricular essay archetype. However, there is a subtle difference in that this prompt allows you to discuss out-of-school activities and academic subjects. This would be a good place to demonstrate your love for a specific topic or activity that you included in other parts of your application. Or, if there is a very important part of your personality that hasn’t been captured by the rest of your application, you can write about that here. 

 

Pick a topic that genuinely interests you. Don’t write an essay about how you love titrating acids and bases to sound “impressive” or “intellectual” if you groan everytime you walk into the chemistry lab. Admissions officers have read enough essays to tell when a student’s tone and details depict a genuine interest in a topic. You are given so much freedom, so you really should write about whatever brings you joy. Maybe you love trying styling hair and nothing brings you as much joy as when you are backstage at your school show and you are styling, braiding, and pinning all of the actors’ hair. A topic like this is unique to the student, and since they are genuinely passionate about hairstyling, it will shine through in their writing.

 

A strong extracurricular essay will either show your emotions and state of mind when you participate in your activity, or how that activity has helped you develop new skills and personality traits. A great essay will do both. Like the other prompts, there is a limited word count to convey not only why you enjoy this activity so much, but how you have improved as a result of this activity. Here’s an example that accomplishes both of these:

 

“It was a hot day in New Orleans and the crowd stuffed together certainly didn’t make things better. Necks were craning to see the spectacle in the middle of the circle. I tugged on my dad’s shirt, and he placed me on top of his shoulders for the best seat in the house. My heart raced every time the daring performer threw a sword up – I really thought he’d eventually slice his hand open. But it was perfect every time. By the end of our trip, I had tried my hand at juggling everything from toothbrushes to balls of socks. My mom was not as enthusiastic when I collected everybody’s knives at dinner to mimic the juggler’s final trick. When I finally got a juggling kit for my next birthday, I devoted every second of my free time to practicing moves I saw on YouTube. With more and more practice, I could tell how long it would take for an object to reach its zenith just by the weight in my hand. At times, the level of control and focus I put into juggling is exhausting, but if I lose focus for one second, I run the risk of serious injury. Some tricks have taken years to perfect, but the gratification when I’ve mastered a new skill makes all my patience worth it. Nothing will be as thrilling as the day my audience’s hearts race with me as I catch a sword in my hand.”

 

While this example is a little over the word count, the student’s passion for juggling is clearly evident. The reader sees what sparked this student’s interest, how it has developed, and how juggling has affected the student. By tying the conclusion back to the anecdote at the beginning, the essay has a satisfying conclusion that makes the reader feel this student is highly motivated by their passion and dreams, which is exactly what Brown is looking for.

 

RISD Applicants, Prompt 1

The Brown|RISD Dual Degree Program draws on the complementary strengths of Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) to provide students with the opportunity to explore diverse spheres of academic and creative inquiry, culminating in a capstone project that interrelates the content, approaches, and methods from two distinct learning experiences.

Based on your understanding of the academic programs at Brown and RISD and the possibilities created by the BRDD program’s broadened learning community, specifically describe how and why the BRDD program would constitute an optimal undergraduate education for you. As part of your answer, be sure to articulate how you might contribute to the Dual Degree community and its commitment to interdisciplinary work. (100-650 words) 

 

The Brown-RISD Dual Degree program is an intense, highly selective (2-3% acceptance) program in which students must get accepted to both Brown and RISD based on their respective criterion, and then be approved by a joint committee. Students in the program exhibit an intense degree of intellectual rigor, as well as a broad ranging curiosity for both an arts and liberal arts education. The key here is to convince the readers that you are a good fit in this specific program, rather than as a Brown student who takes a few RISD classes or a RISD student who takes a few Brown classes.

 

In this essay, you must be specific about why you would be a better fit spending five years getting degrees from both Brown and RISD rather than getting one degree from either of the schools. You must show that it is necessary for you to get both degrees, and how you would like to use the knowledge you gain from both schools in your future. It’s incredibly important to highlight the interdisciplinary nature of your goals, as this is specifically called out in the prompt. 

 

With 650 available words, this essay should feature the same depth as your Common App essay, and should complement it. Although the two should not overlap in content, you can definitely expand on topics you briefly touched on in one essay in the other. Here are a few possible avenues you could explore in this essay:

 

(1) Students in the program stretch the gamut of possible Brown + RISD major combinations: furniture and applied mathematics, computer science and industrial design, and comparative literature and painting. The program prides itself on this diversity, so explain how your passions and interests are disparate, but also connected to your overall identity. Talk about how being surrounded with other Brown-RISD students will foster your wide-ranging intellectual and artistic curiosities even further.

 

(2) If you ultimately want to become an artist, you could talk about how important the liberal arts have been and will be for you. Maybe you find literature critical for escaping into the worlds you want to create visually, and you want to dive deeper during your undergraduate years.

 

(3) Maybe you want to study both biology and industrial design, because you want to base your design work on biomimicry. You could talk about how you would draw equally from both fields, and how you want to design better transportation devices that take from the best methods of nature.

 

(4) Say you’ve always been interested in your Korean heritage and finding ways to express that through art. As a result, you want to study East Asian history at Brown, where you will understand the context that your parents immigrated out of, and textiles at RISD, where you can craft bojagi (Korean wrapping cloth) with a sensitivity to its historical context.

 

(5) Maybe you’ve always been passionate about both art and liberal arts, but have no concrete connection between the two, and that’s also perfectly fine. You could talk about how you want to further explore and hone in these passions, so that by your second year of undergrad, you’ll have a stronger idea of what specifically you want to study.

 

Your art portfolio, Common App essay, and other supplemental essays will also speak volumes about who you are, so make sure to use this essay to highlight parts of yourself previously unmentioned. You’ve also probably spent the previous essays explaining “why Brown,” so use this essay to delve deep into why you would thrive in an arts and design centered environment in conjunction with Brown’s liberal arts curriculum.

 

 

PLME Applicants Only

 

Brown’s Program in Liberal Medical Education (PLME) is a prestigious 8 year BS/MD program in which accepted students are automatically accepted into Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School. For more about PLME, check out our comprehensive guide.

 

PLME Applicants, Prompt 1

Committing to a future career as a physician while in high school requires careful consideration and self-reflection. What values and experiences have led you to believe that becoming a doctor in medicine is the right fit for you? (250 words) 

 

The Program in Liberal Medical Education (as well as other accelerated medical programs) is a huge commitment for 17 and 18 year olds, who are essentially saying that they know what they want to do for the rest of their lives. As a result, Brown admissions officers want to accept candidates whom they believe have tangible reasons as to why they want to become doctors. These reasons may include clinical and laboratory experience, as well as a general passion to improve the well being of others.

 

In this prompt, reflecting on past experiences is critical. Whether that is shadowing a pediatrician at your local hospital for a summer, volunteering with an organization like the Red Cross, or doing lab research on pancreatic cancer, let the admissions team know that you have past experiences engaging in clinical or laboratory work, and that these experiences have increased your desire to enter the medical profession.

 

Moreover, bring in your past experiences with the healthcare field, such as seeing a loved relation hospitalized, if they instilled within you a desire to eventually enter and better the industry. As a warning, however, it is easy to fall into the cliche of witnessing an older relative, usually a grandparent, pass away due to illness, and afterwards deciding to pursue medicine as a career. In cases such as these, make sure to make the experience as unique to you as possible, and use this experience as a jumping off point to other activities you have done pertaining to the health field.  

 

Afterwards, brainstorm the key values you hold for your life. If you are not sure of your values, think back to how you have spent your time: if you’ve spent significant amounts of time volunteering out of goodwill, or caring for family members, or tutoring your peers, chances are, your values may center around caring for others in need, and looking beyond yourself, both of which are critical components of good doctors. A love for interacting with other people and learning about them is a key component in being a doctor, so make sure to illustrate this point through your experiences. Using concrete things you’ve done in the past to color your values is much more powerful than just stating “my values are helping those in need.”

 

You could even talk about other extracurriculars you’ve tried, but simply did not enjoy as much as health-related activities, to further cement how being a doctor is the only foreseeable career route you see yourself being fulfilled and satisfied in. Overall, just go off your past experiences in health related fields, your current ideas and beliefs, and your future dreams and goals.

 

PLME Applicants, Prompt 2

Select one of the following to answer for the second essay: (250 words)

1. Health care is constantly changing, as it is affected by racial and social disparities, economics, politics, and technology, among other factors. How will you, as a future physician, make a positive impact?

2. How do you feel your personal background provides you with a unique perspective of medicine?

 

Both of these prompt choices are very similar to the diversity essay archetype. Regardless of which prompt you choose, Brown PLME is looking for an essay that specifically focuses on how you will contribute to the diverse community of students at Brown, either via your background or your actions. 

 

Option 1

 

If you choose the first prompt, your essay should look to the future and answer how you will address a specific issue you see in health care today. Maybe you are concerned with high maternal mortality rates among mothers from lower socioeconomic statuses, and you want to work as an OBGYN in underprivileged areas to provide mothers with more attentive care. Possibly you are interested in developing a pill that will instantly stop bug bites from itching, because after years of your family’s annual camping trip you know how pesky bug bites can be.

 

Once you identify this specific aspect of health care which you are interested in and why you are interested, you should go into detail about how you hope to improve this issue. A student who already has experience with their issue might write about how in high school she tried to deter students from vaping by forming a Students Against Nicotine club at her school. However, once she has a medical background, she plans to specialize in respiratory illnesses so she can give talks at schools about the science behind what vaping does to a person’s lungs. Another student might not have prior experience with racial disparities in health care, but they know that they want to address the toxic stress minority communities face which contributes to major health complications. This student could discuss their plan to popularize a method for identifying and prescribing toxic stress as a medical condition.

 

It’s important that your response to this prompt includes what you are interested in doing as a physician, where you learned about this issue or what sparked your interest in this specific topic, and how you plan to make a difference one day. You can further strengthen your response by describing how specific resources and opportunities (classes, researching with professors, clubs and organizations, etc) at Brown will allow you to reach your goals and address the issue. Given the limited amount of space, it’s okay if you aren’t able to include resources at Brown, because a bigger focus should be on your aspirations and how you plan to solve a problem.

 

One common mistake that students will make when it comes to this prompt is creating a potential impact in medicine that is not strongly reflected in the rest of their application. You don’t necessarily need to have worked in a hospital or a lab to connect the issue you are interested in to your application, but you could have attended lectures and seminars on the topic, taken a class at a university about it, or read scientific journals and papers that discussed it. However, don’t claim you want to investigate the impact of biased artificial intelligence radiology tools in providing care for people of color without being able to explain where your interest and knowledge of this issue came from. 

 

Option 2

 

The second option would be good for you if you either have a unique background you think is underrepresented in the medical profession, or if you have a long history of being around medical professionals. For this prompt, you should describe what your unique background is, how it will help you as a physician, and how it will make you a good fit in the Brown PLME community. Your backgrounds could include being a specific race or ethnicity, living in a lower income household, athletic interests, your place in the LGBTQ+ community, a medical condition, and more. 

 

A common mistake in this post is not providing insight into why your unique background is critical to you entering the medical field. Because this is a PLME essay, you want to emphasize the impact of your actions on medicine. In fact, in almost all BS/MD admissions essays, you want to emphasize medicine as much as possible. 

 

A student who wants to write about growing up in a lower income household might describe how drug prices are so expensive she’s seen friends, family, and neighbors sacrifice their own health to afford rent. She would discuss how rather than allowing her outrage and contempt towards drug companies to blind her, she wants to get an education to learn how she can expand coverage for drugs so insurance companies bear the cost, rather than the poor.

 

Another student who grew up constantly being admitted to hospitals for one medical complication or another could write about how he spent his time asking all his doctors and nurses questions about how different procedures are done or how specific technology is used. He might say that he not only understands what a kind, attentive doctor looks like after meeting dozens of doctors, but he has also learned tips and tricks he can’t wait to use when he is a doctor.

 

After reading your essay, the admissions officers should be convinced that you are a diverse individual who has an important background that the Brown medical community will learn from. You want to provide insight into who you are, as well as how you will contribute to making Brown a more inclusive and diverse community.

 

PLME Applicants, Prompt 3

How do you envision the Program in Liberal Medical Education (PLME) helping you to meet your academic personal and professional goals as a person and as a physician of the future? (500 words) 

 

The Program in Liberal Medical Education is designed to foster intellectual exploration among its cohort of undergraduates, so you definitely want to talk about how your academic interests don’t simply reside in the biological sciences. Talk about how although you want to become a doctor, there are numerous other facets of your identity that don’t fit in the narrow pre-med curricular path. Explain how these interests can be cultivated at Brown, and how they will ultimately allow you to become a better doctor.

 

Many of the students in the PLME program don’t major in traditional pre-med fields during their undergraduate years, as they are freed from doing so (outside from a few pre-med requirements). Students can thus craft an interdisciplinary education that allows them to pursue interests outside of the narrow pre-med curriculum. Overall, there are so many different academic fields that tie back to the core of being a doctor, and so make sure to express that fully. Here a few examples:

 

(1) If you have a strong passion for the humanities, mention that, and then talk about how topics like literature and anthropology allow you to grow in empathy and understanding for the world around you. For example, you could talk about your passion for Hispanic cultures, and how you want to continue learning Spanish to form better patient-doctor relations with underserved Hispanic communities in your hometown.

 

(2) If you’re interested in computer science, talk about your experiences coding, and how you want to be better equipped as the medicine field ultimately will become more technology oriented. You could talk about how you want to be at the forefront of the burgeoning connection between artificial intelligence and health outcomes, and how being in the program will allow you to do so.

 

(3) There are plenty of classes you can point to that merge the biological sciences with the humanities. Using Brown’s online course catalog, you can pull up titles such as “Medicine and Public Health in Africa,” “Pain and the Human Condition,” and “Health, Hunger, and the Household in Developing Countries” to find courses that interest you and illustrate how you need these intersectional courses to become the doctor you want to be.

 

(4) You could even mention interdisciplinary programs at Brown’s Warren Alpert medical school, such as its Scholarly Concentration program, which allows students to pursue areas such as Medical Humanities, Medical Technology and Innovation, and Advocacy and Activism. You could also mention the medical school’s Narrative Medicine classes, or its unique MD-ScM program, which combines primary care and population health.

 

Personal goals and professional goals are often one and the same, but make sure you have personal goals that extend beyond the confines of a career (as mentioned in the previous prompt). Yes, you’d like to become a doctor, but the PLME environment is exactly the one that you need to thrive as a curious human. Talk about your need for Brown’s Open Curriculum to thrive not just as a future doctor, but as an intellectual being who cares about the world. Talk about how being a part of the PLME would allow you to best prepare for the two halves of your career in medicine, science and human interaction, and why you would thrive in this profession that simultaneously juggles both.

 

Regarding professional goals, you could talk about how being a part of the PLME would mean the rare once in a lifetime chance of satisfying all your intellectual curiosities in undergrad while being able to go to medical school and become a doctor.

 

Where to Get Your Brown School Essay Edited for Free

 

Do you want feedback on your Brown essay? After reading your essays over and over, it can be difficult to evaluate your writing objectively. That’s why we created our Peer Essay Review tool, where you can get a free review of your essay from another student. Since they don’t know you personally, they can be a more objective judge of whether your personality shines through, and whether you’ve fully answered the prompt. 

 

You can also improve your own writing skills by reviewing other students’ essays. We highly recommend giving this tool a try!

 


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