With the 2017-2018 application cycle soon to be underway, the essay team here at CollegeVine has decided to share some of our best tips and strategies on how to write the all-important Common App essays. This year, The Common Application has announced various revisions and additions to its essay prompts. In total, three of the original five prompts have been revised, and two entirely new prompts have been added. In this blog post, we’ll provide advice on how to break down these prompts, organize your thoughts, and craft a strong, meaningful response that will make admissions committees take notice.

 

Overview of the Common App

 

The Common App essay is the best way for admissions committees to get to you know you. While SAT scores, your past course load, and your grades provide a quantitative picture of you as a student, the Common App essay offers adcoms a refreshing glimpse into your identity and personality. For this reason, try to treat the essay as an opportunity to tell colleges why you are unique and/or what matters to you. Since your Common App essay will be seen by numerous colleges, you will want to paint a portrait of yourself that is accessible to a breadth of institutions and admissions officers (for example, if you are only applying to Engineering programs at some schools, don’t focus your Common App on STEM at the expense of your other applications. Save that for your supplemental essays).

 

In short, be open and willing to write about a topic you love, whether it is sports, music, politics, food, or watching movies. The Common App essay is more of a conversation than a job interview.

 


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Strategy for Writing the Common App 2017-2018 Essays

 

Because the Common App essay is 650 words long and includes minimal formal directions, organizing a response can seem daunting. Fortunately, at CollegeVine, we have developed a simple approach to formulating strong, unique responses.

 

This section outlines how to: 1) Brainstorm, 2) Organize, and 3) Write a Common App essay.

 

Brainstorm: Before reading the Common App prompts, brainstorming is a critical exercise to develop high-level ideas. One way to construct high-level idea would be to delve into a passion and focus on how you interact with the concept or activity. For example, using “creative writing” as a high-level idea, one could stress their love of world-building, conveying complex emotions, and depicting character interactions, emphasizing how writing stems from real-life experiences. A different idea that doesn’t involve an extracurricular activity would be to discuss how your personality has developed in relation to your family; maybe one sibling is hot-headed, the other quiet, and you’re in the middle as the voice of reason (or maybe you’re the hot-head). These are simply two examples of infinitely many ideas you may come up with. To begin developing your own high level ideas, you should address these Core Four questions that all good Common App essays should answer:

 

      1. “Who Am I?”
      2. “Why Am I Here?”
      3. “What is Unique About Me?”
      4. “What Matters to Me?”

 

The first question focuses on your personality traits—who you are. The second question targets your progression throughout high school (an arc or journey). The third question is more difficult to grasp, but it involves showing why your personality traits, methods of thinking, areas of interest, and tangible skills form a unique combination. The fourth question is a concluding point that can be answered simply, normally in the conclusion paragraph i.e. “Writing matters to me” or “Family matters to me.” Overall, there is no single “correct” topic. You will be great as long as you are comfortable and passionate about your idea and it answers the Core Four questions.

 

Organize: Common App essays are not traditional 5 paragraph essays. You are free to be creative in structure, employ dialogue, and use vivid descriptions. Be careful, however, that context and logic are inherent in your essay. From paragraph to paragraph, from sentence to sentence, ideas must be linked and sensical. Utilizing a story arc following a few major points or focusing on cause and effect are logical ways to organize a Common App essay.

 

Write: Your Common App essay must display excellent writing in terms of grammar and sentence structure. The essay doesn’t need to be a Greek epic, but it should be well-written and clear. A few tips to accomplish this are:

 

      1. Show Don’t Tell
      2. Be Specific
      3. Choose Active Voice not Passive Voice
      4. Avoid Clichés

 

“Show Don’t Tell” has been stressed time and time again by English teachers, and it will be stressed again here. Instead of saying, “I was angered and mortified by the sight of the injustice,” you can show your disgust by writing, “As I watched the scene unfold, my fists tightened while my stomach coiled in knots.”

 

In many cases, writing can include more specific word choice. For example, “As a kid, I always played basketball,” can be improved to be “Every day after school as kid, I ran home, laced up my sneakers, and shot basketball in my driveway until the sun went down and I could barely see.”

 

Active Voice vs. Passive Voice simply requires one to employ action verbs instead of linking verbs, where applicable.

 

Avoiding clichés like adages, sayings, and quotes that do not directly apply to the essay is important for writing a refreshing, unique essay.


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Deciding on a Prompt

 

This section provides insights and examples for each of the 7 Common App essay prompts for the 2017-2018 cycle. Each of these prompts lends itself to distinct topics and strategies, so selecting the prompt that best aligns with your idea is essential to writing an effective Common App essay.

 

Some Students Have a Background, Identity, Interest …

 

  1. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

 

This prompt offers an excellent opportunity to engage with a particular extracurricular or academic area of passion and allows you to weave together a narrative that displays personal growth in that subject or area. An essay that displays your personality and a unique interest or skill can be attention-grabbing, particularly if you have an unconventional passion, such as blogging about Chinese basketball, or urban exploration.

 

However, don’t feel intimidated if you don’t have a passion that is immediately “unique.” Even an interest like “arctic scuba diving” will fail as an essay topic unless it is written with meaningful insight and personality. Instead of attempting to knock the socks off the Admissions Officer by making up crazy, strange, or shocking things, think about the things you spend the most time doing and ask yourself why you do them. In the same way, think about your upbringing, identity, and experiences and ask yourself, “What has impacted me in a meaningful way thus far?”

 

Here are a few examples of responses:

 

  1. Background: A person’s background includes experiences, training, education, and culture. You can discuss the experience of growing up, interacting with family or siblings, and how relationships have molded who you are today. A background can include training or experiences with arts, music, sciences, sports, writing, and many other learned skills. Background also includes the social environment(s) from which a person comes from and how one’s environments has influenced their thought processes, opinions, and perceptions. In addition, you can highlight intersections between multiple backgrounds and show how each is integral to who you are.
  2. Identity: This prompt also represents an opportunity to consider questions of personal identity, whether that takes the form of racial identity, sexual orientation, gender, or simply one’s place within a specific community (even communities as unique as, say, players of World of Warcraft). With the topic of racial identity, it’s important to keep in mind the audience (college admissions counselors tend to be progressive politically), so this might not be the best place to make sweeping claims about the state of race relations today. However, careful consideration of intrinsic cultural elements can certainly make for a strong essay topic. Alternatively, focusing on a dominant personality trait can also make for a compelling theme. For example, if you are extremely outgoing, you could explain how your adventurousness has allowed you to learn from a diverse group of friends and the random situations you find yourself in. If you are meticulous and detail-oriented, you can touch on how your personality shapes your view of the world and drives your actions. What do you see on daily basis that can be fixed? Why do you focus on the little things?
  3. Interests: An interest differs from an activity because you do not necessarily have to be a member of a club, organization, or team devoted to something to have an interest in it. Writing about an interest is a tremendous way to highlight passions that may not come across in the rest of your application. For example, if you are a wrestler, writing about your interest in public speaking would be a refreshing addition to your application. If you are a pianist, highlighting your interest in watching and learning standup comedy would have a similar effect and show admissions officers a side to you they won’t expect.

 

What Lessons Did You Learn?

 

  1. The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

 

This prompt lends itself to consideration of what facets of your personality allow you to overcome adversity. While it’s okay to choose a relatively mundane “failure” such as failing to win an award at a Model United Nations conference, another (perhaps more powerful) tactic for this essay is to write about a foundational failure and then assess its impact on your development thereafter.  

There are times in life when you feel shaken, as if the rug has been ripped from underneath you. There are times when you experience failure to the point that you want to give up since you don’t see a solution. This essay is about your response when the rug has been pulled and your actions when you don’t see a solution to a challenge.

For example, if you lost a friend due to an argument, you can analyze the positions from both sides, evaluate your decisions, and identify why you were wrong. The key is explaining your thought process and growth following the event to highlight how your thinking has changed. Did you ever admit your fault and seek to fix the problem? Have your treated others differently since then? How has the setback changed the way you view arguments and fights now? Is it better to always be correct, or to be able to see both sides of an issue? Framing the prompt in this way allows you to tackle heavier questions about ethics and demonstrate your self-awareness.

If you haven’t experienced a “big” failure, another angle to take would be to discuss smaller, repeated failures that are either linked or similar thematically. For example, if you used to stutter or get nervous in social situations or when you were in a large group, you could discuss the steps you took to fix your issue or find an alternate solution. Even if you don’t have a massive foundational challenge to write about, a recurring challenge or failure can translate to a powerful essay topic, especially if the steps you took to overcome this repeated failure help expose a quality of your personality.

 

Reflect on a Time When You Questioned or Challenged a Belief or Idea

  1. Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?

 

This prompt is difficult to answer because most high school students haven’t participated in the types of iconoclastic protests against societal ills that lend themselves to an excellent response. However, a more tenable alternative here is to discuss a time that you went against social convention, whether it was by becoming friends with someone who seemed like a social outcast or by proudly showing off a geeky passion of yours. And if you ever participated in a situation in concert with adults and found some success (i.e. by blogging, starting a tutoring organization, or participating in political campaigns), you could discuss your experiences as a young person without a college degree in professional and adult circles. However, avoid sounding morally superior (as if you are the only person who went against this social convention, or that you are better than your peers for doing so).

Another way to answer this prompt is to discuss a time when you noticed a need for change. For example, if you wondered why medical records are often handwritten or why doctor’s visits can be long and awkward, you could challenge the norm in healthcare by brainstorming an electronic recording smartphone app or a telemedicine system. In a similar way, if you led a fundraiser and recognized that advertising on social media would be more effective than the traditional use of printed flyers, you could write about a topic along those lines as well. Focus on what action or experience caused you to recognize the need for change and follow with your actions and resulting outcome.

As a whole, this prompt lends itself to reflective writing, and more specifically, talking the reader through your thought processes. In many cases, the exploration of your thought processes and decision-making is more important than the actual outcome or concept in question. In short, this essay is very much about “thinking,” rumination, and inquisition. A good brainstorming exercise for this prompt would be to write your problem on a sheet of paper, and then develop various solutions to the problem, including a brief reason for justification. The more thorough you are in justifying and explaining your solutions in the essay, the more compelling your response will be.

Describe a Problem You’ve Solved or a Problem You’d Like to Solve

 

  1. Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma—anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.

 

The prompt itself provides three specific suggestions (intellectual challenge, research query, and ethical dilemma), but it should be clarified that the phrase “anything that is of personal importance” gives you a lot of freedom, allowing you to center your essay around essentially anything that can be loosely called a “problem.” Our advice is to pick a problem that deeply concerns you and make it clear to your reader why that topic matters to you at all, either through an origin story of how you became interested in the query or through an explanation of the potential consequences of the dilemma (depending on your topic).

Even though the prompt allows you to explore more academic and intellectual topics, it is important not to get carried away with esoteric details. Just be careful you don’t go overboard with an intensely intricate discussion about particle physics, however, geeking out a bit and validating your passion is encouraged. Bottomline, the topic you choose for this prompt should, like every topic, highlight your personality, identity, and how you think about the world.

Be sure to describe the event or experience that caused you to realize the gravity of the problem, the specific actions you took to plan or execute your solution (i.e. call sponsors, reach out to contacts, raise money, design graphics, speak at events), explain why solving your problem is so critical, and identify the tangible change your solution would bring to people’s lives. For example, if you care deeply about drug education because of a past experience with a friend or family member, you could outline a plan to bring young-adult or teen speakers to your school or community to positively influence your peers and stress the real dangers of drugs.

As an alternative, this prompt gives you the opportunity to address a more ambitious, hypothetical problem you would like to solve. For example, you could address the logistical and legal problems of high speed rail in the United States, the complex environmental and economic problem of using fossil fuels, or even the ethical dilemma of creating A.I. As long as you are creative and refrain from choosing a cliche topic like “curing cancer,” addressing a hypothetical problem can result in a strong essay. Be careful to frame your hypothetical problem clearly, explain why it is a problem, outline the important points, and explain your steps to create a solution.

 

Discuss an Accomplishment, Event, or Realization

  1. Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.

 

This prompt is expansive in that you can choose any accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked personal growth or new understanding. One option is to discuss a formal accomplishment or event (whether it is a religious ritual or social rite of passage) that reflects personal growth. If you go this route, make sure to discuss why the ritual was meaningful and how specific aspects of said ritual contributed to your personal growth. An example of this could be the meaning of becoming an Eagle Scout to you, the accomplishment of being elected to Senior Leadership, or completing a Confirmation. In the case of religious topics, however, be sure to not get carried away with  details, and focus on the nature of your personal growth and new understanding—know your audience.

Alternatively, a more relaxed way to address this prompt is using an informal event or realization, which would allow you to show more personality and creativity. An example of this could be learning how to bake with your mother, thus sparking a newfound connection with her, allowing you to learn about her past. Having a long discussion about life or philosophy with your father could also suffice, thus sparking more thoughts about your identity. You could write about a realization that caused you to join a new organization or quit an activity you did not think you would enjoy, as doing so would force you to grow out of your comfort zone to try new things.

The key to answering this prompt is clearly defining what it is that sparked your growth, and then describing in detail the nature of this growth and how it related to your perception of yourself and others. This part of the essay is crucial, as you must dedicate sufficient time to not undersell the description of how you grew instead of simply explaining the experience and then saying, “I grew.” This description of how you grew must be specific, in-depth, and it does not have to be simple. Your growth can also be left open-ended if you are still learning from your experiences today.

 

What is Captivating and Makes You Curious?

  1. Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more?

 

This prompt allows you to expand and deepen a seemingly small or simple idea, topic, or concept. One example could be “stars,” in that you could describe stargazing as a child, counting them, recognizing constellations, and then transforming that initial captivation into a deeper appreciation of the cosmos as a whole, spurring a love of astronomy and physics. Another example could be “language,” discussing how it has evolved and changed over the course of history, how it allows you to look deeper into different cultures, how learning different languages stretches the mind. A tip for expanding on these topics and achieving specificity is to select particular details of the topic that you find intriguing and explain why. For example, if you are passionate about cooking or baking, you could use specific details by explaining, in-depth, the intricate attention and artistry necessary to make a dish or dessert. You can delve into why certain spices or garnishes are superior in different situations, how flavors blend well together and can be mixed creatively, or even the chemistry differences between steaming, searing, and grilling.

 

Regardless of your topic, this prompt provides an excellent opportunity to display writing prowess through elegant, specific descriptions that leverage sensory details. Describing the beauty of the night sky, the rhythms and sounds of different languages, or the scent of a crème brûlée shows passion and captivation in a very direct, evocative way.

 

The key to writing this essay is answering the question of why something captivates you instead of simply ending with “I love surfing.” A tip would be to play off your senses (for applicable topics), think about what you see, feel, smell, hear, and taste. In the case of surfing, the salty water, weightlessness of bobbing over the waves, and fresh air could cater to senses. Alternatively, for less physical topics, you can use a train of thought and descriptions to show vividly how your mind dwells on the topic until you “lose all track of time.” Well-executed trains of thought or similar tactics are successful ways to convey passion for a certain topic. To answer what or who you turn to when you want to learn more, you can be authentic and honest—if it’s Google, Wikipedia, a teacher, friend, YouTube Channel, or anything, you simply have to show how you interact with the medium.

 

When brainstorming this particular essay, a tip would be to use a web diagram, placing the topic in the middle and thinking about branching characteristics, themes, or concepts related to the topic that are directly engaging and captivating to you. In doing so, you will be able to gauge the depth of the topic and whether or not it will suffice for this prompt.

 

Share an Essay on Any Topic of Your Choice

  1. Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you’ve already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.

 

This prompt is designed to be open-ended, allowing you to express what you want to express if it does not align directly with the other prompts. While this prompt is very open-ended, it does not mean you can adapt any essay you have written and think it will suffice. Always refer back to the Strategy section of this article and make sure the topic and essay of your choice addresses the Core Four questions necessary for a good Common App essay.

 

This prompt, more than the others, poses a high risk but also a high potential reward. Writing your own question allows you to demonstrate individuality and confidence. Here, you can innovate an essay that tackles a difficult or controversial topic (for example, whether to raise or lower taxes) or presents information with a unique format (such as a conversation with an historical figure).

 

We encourage you to try something unconventional for this prompt, like comparing your personality to a Pollock or Picasso painting, using an extended philosophical metaphor to describe your four years of high school, or writing in a poetic style to display your love of poetry. If you are extremely passionate about a topic or an expert in a certain area, for example Renaissance technology, or journalism during World War II, you can use this prompt to show your authority on a subject by discussing it at a high level. Be careful to frame the essay in a way that is accessible to the average reader while still incorporating quality evidence and content that would qualify you as an expert. As always, exercise caution in writing about controversial social or political topics, and always make sure to consider your audience and what they are looking for in a student.

 

To reiterate: this type of prompt does not have distinct guidelines and exhibits a high degree of variability, risk, and potential for reward. Sometimes an unconventional essay can capture Admissions Officers’ attention and move them in a profound way, yet other times the concept can fly completely over their heads. Be sure to execute the essay clearly and justify your decision by hearing high quality feedback from reliable sources. As always, the essay should demonstrate something meaningful about you, whether it is your personality, thought process, or values.

 

In conclusion…

 

All Common App essays must show your personality, identity, and aspirations, as well as spark discussions on interests, character, values, and community. The goal for any Common App essay is to impart a lasting, authentic image and sense of yourself on the reader. When you’re writing and hit a mental block, don’t hesitate to refer back to the Core Four questions a good Common App essay must answer and always check whether or not the ideas in your essay reflect the characteristics you want to convey about yourself.

 

With these tips and strategies, you should be well on your way to writing a perfect Common App essay. Best of luck from the CollegeVine team!

 

For more help, feel free to check out last year’s post on How to Tackle the Common App Essays or reach out to work 1-on-1 with one of CollegeVine’s trained college essay specialists.

CollegeVine College Essay Team

CollegeVine College Essay Team

Our college essay experts go through a rigorous selection process, evaluated upon their skill in writing and knowledge of college admissions. We then train them on how to interpret prompts, facilitate the brainstorming process, and provide inspiration for great essays, with curriculum culled from our years of experience helping students write essays that work.
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